The Catholic Homeschool Society Nationwide Group

TRUST IN GOD

Life is much more important than food, and the body much more important than clothes. Instead, be concerned with His Kingdom, and He will provide you with these things.
Luke 12:23,31


Saturday, February 26, 2011

Family Bible Study - 8th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Gospel Passage
Matt. 6:24 Jesus said, “No one can serve two masters; for either he will hate the one
and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot
serve God and mammon. 25 “Therefore I tell you, do not be anxious about your life,
what you shall eat or what you shall drink, nor about your body, what you shall put
on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? 26 Look at the birds
of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly
Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? 27 And which of you by
being anxious can add one cubit to his span of life? 28 And why are you anxious
about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they neither toil nor
spin; 29 yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.
30 But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is alive and tomorrow is
thrown into the oven, will he not much more clothe you, O men of little faith? 31
Therefore do not be anxious, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or
‘What shall we wear?’ 32 For the Gentiles seek all these things; and your heavenly
Father knows that you need them all. 33 But seek first his kingdom and his
righteousness, and all these things shall be yours as well. 34 “Therefore do not be
anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Let the day’s own
trouble be sufficient for the day.

Questions for discussion -

1. Jesus says we should not be anxious or worried about even the things we
really need in life: food, drink, clothing, housing. Why does he say we
shouldn’t be worried?

2. If we shouldn’t worry about what we really need in life (food, drink,
clothing or housing), is there anything else we should be worried about?

3. Jesus says, “Seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness and all
these things shall be given you as well.” What does it mean to seek God’s
kingdom first? Which saint famously preached quite often on these words?
used with permission - Fr. Roger Landry

Sunday Gospel Message - 8th Sunday in Ordinary Time

EIGHTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
True love of God and true Christian love of
neighbor, though they may sound easy, will make great
and sometimes severe demands on the true Christian. The
love of neighbor may be the harder of the two. We have
so many reasons for loving God, for thanking and adoring
him. But the neighbor, who often seems so unworthy of
our charitable help, who is so often ungrateful, how
difficult it is to continue being kind and helpful to him!
Yet it is by our true love of neighbor that we prove our
love for God.
used with permission - Msgr. Bob Lawrence

Saturday, February 19, 2011

Sunday Gospel Message - 7th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Charity begins at home, because it is here that it can and should be learned and practiced. It is first and foremost necessary for Christian peace in the home. Husband and wife must learn to understand and tolerate each other's imperfections and faults. If there is peace and harmony between husband and wife, the children will learn too to be understanding and forgiving. Such a home will be a truly happy home even if it has little of the world's riches. Our charity must spread from the home to our neighbors; to all those with whom we have contact. Try the sunny smile of true love, the kindly word of Christian encouragement, the helping hand of true charity, and not only will you brighten the darkness and lighten the load of your brother but you will be imitating in your own small way the perfect Father of love who is in Heaven.
used with permission - Msgr. Bob Lawrence

Family Bible Study - 7th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Gospel Passage
Matt. 5:38 Jesus said, “You have heard that it was said, ‘An eye for an eye
and a tooth for a tooth.’ 39 But I say to you, Do not resist one who is evil. But
if any one strikes you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also; 40 and if
any one would sue you and take your coat, let him have your cloak as well;
41 and if any one forces you to go one mile, go with him two miles. 42 Give
to him who begs from you, and do not refuse him who would borrow from
you. 43 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and
hate your enemy.’ 44 But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those
who persecute you, 45 so that you may be sons of your Father who is in
heaven; for he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain
on the just and on the unjust. 46 For if you love those who love you, what
reward have you? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? 47 And if you
salute only your brethren, what more are you doing than others? Do not
even the Gentiles do the same? 48 You, therefore, must be perfect, as your
heavenly Father is perfect..”

Questions for discussion:

1. Jesus says that we must be perfect as God the Father is perfect. Does this
mean we can never get or do anything wrong? If not,
what do you think it means?

2. Jesus says that it’s not enough to love those who love us or be good to those
who are good to us. We need to be good even to those who treat us badly.
When someone is mean to you, are you mean
back to them or do you try to be good to them even when they’re mean to you?

3. Jesus says that we should pray for those who are bad and full of hate. Do
you pray for people in this way, that God may be merciful to them and help
them change and become good?
used with permission - Fr. Roger Landry

Saturday, February 12, 2011

Family Bible Study - 6th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Gospel Passage
Matt. 5:20 For I tell you, unless your holiness exceeds that of the scribes and
Pharisees, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. 21 "You have heard
that it was said to the men of old, `You shall not kill; and whoever kills shall
be liable to judgment.' 22 But I say to you that every one who is angry with
his brother shall be liable to judgment; whoever insults his brother shall be
liable to the council, and whoever says, `You fool!' shall be liable to the hell
of fire. 27 "You have heard that it was said, `You shall not commit
adultery.' 28 But I say to you that every one who looks at a woman lustfully
has already committed adultery with her in his heart. 33 "Again you have
heard that it was said to the men of old, `You shall not swear falsely, but
shall perform to the Lord what you have sworn.' 34 But I say to you, Do not
swear at all, either by heaven, for it is the throne of God, 37 Let what you
say be simply `Yes' or `No'; anything more than this comes from evil.

Questions for discussion:

1. Jesus says that in order to enter into heaven, our holiness has to be greater
than that of the scribes and pharisees. How do we become holy? How does
God try to make us holy? (Hint: a 10 letter word starting & ending with “s”).

2. Several times in this passage, Jesus quotes a part of the Old Testament and
then says, “But I say to you.” What do you think Jesus was trying to show by
saying “I say to you” in contrast with the word of God in Sacred Scripture?

3. Jesus says that being angry with someone else is like killing them. Why do
you think he says this?
used with permission - Fr. Roger Landry

Saturday, February 5, 2011

Sunday Gospel Message - 5th Sunday in Ordinary Time

FIFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
No less an authority than Christ himself calls his
true followers the "salt of the earth." and the "light of the
world." These are titles of honor, and of the greatest
distinction. Christ is putting his true follower on almost a
level with himself. He was the light of the world; he was the
salt of the earth. It was he who gave men the knowledge of
the true nature of God. It was he who gave this life its flavor,
who gave this life its meaning, its preservation. By his death
and resurrection he took away the sting of death, and
removed its eternal corruption, by the guarantee and promise
of a resurrection to an eternal life.
Life on earth is short. The demands of our Christian
life may not always be easy, but we know that if we live up
to them, we are like Christ. We are continuing his great work
by our own good example to our neighbor, and we are giving
glory to God, and are earning for ourselves the eternal light
of heaven.
used with permission - Msgr. Bob Lawrence

Family Bible Study - 5th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Gospel Passage
Matt. 5:13 "You are the salt of the earth; but if salt has lost its taste, how
shall its saltness be restored? It is no longer good for anything except to be
thrown out and trodden under foot by men. 14 "You are the light of the
world. A city set on a hill cannot be hid. 15 Nor do men light a lamp and
put it under a bushel, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. 16
Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and
give glory to your Father who is in heaven.
Questions
1. Jesus calls us the “salt of the earth.” Why? What was salt meant to do? How are Christians supposed to be this type of
salt on earth?

2. Jesus calls us “the light of the world.” But he also says in St. John’s Gospel,
“I am the Light of the World.” How can he and us both be the light of the
world? What is the relationship between His light and our light?

3. Jesus says that our light should shine before others so that others, in seeing
our good deeds, might praise God. Are you enthusiastic in living your faith, so
that others might see your faith and praise God? If so, how?
used with permission - Fr. Roger Landry